Child Care

  • Media Coverage
    February 11, 2011 - 4:00pm

    NonProfit Resource Memo

  • Issues
    March 16, 2010 - 11:07am

    Losing Ground in Early Childhood Education, 1980-2004

    Since the early 1980s, there has been a large and unsettling dip in the qualifications of the center-based early childhood workforce nationwide, with 30% of teachers and administrators now having just a high school diploma or less, according to a comprehensive new report published on September 15, 2005 by the Economic Policy Institute, the Keystone Research Center, and the Foundation for Child Development.

  • Press Release
    April 22, 2009 - 5:13pm

    HARRISBURG, PA—Pennsylvania workers, like workers across the nation, have seen their wages stagnate or grow slowly in recent decades. But a report released today shows that being in a union significantly boosts the wages of Pennsylvania workers employed in service industries.


    The report, released jointly by the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) in Washington, D.C., and the Keystone Research Center (KRC) in Harrisburg, finds that unionization raises the wages of the average service-sector worker in Pennsylvania by nearly 9 percent.

  • Press Release
    November 1, 2007 - 11:25am

    Harrisburg, November 1, 2007--Pennsylvania, with a long tradition of innovation in expanding worker voice, took another step into the history books yesterday, becoming home to a new kind of union whose members often wear party hats rather than hard hats, and forge character rather than steel.


    Following a union certification election in which votes in favor of forming a union exceeded votes against by 96% to 4%, some 3,700 home-based child-care providers across the state became members of a new kind of union, Child Care Providers UNITED (CCPUNITED).

  • Press Release
    May 2, 2007 - 11:26am

    By 2050, Universal Statewide Program Would Produce 12 Dollars in Benefits for Each Dollar Invested

    Harrisburg - If PA wants to build a strong economy, increase earnings, reduce crime, and balance budgets, a good place to start is with high quality pre-kindergarten for the state's children, according to a new study by the Economic Policy Institute that was released in Pennsylvania by Keystone Research Center.

  • Press Release
    September 15, 2005 - 11:56am

    Pennsylvania Issue Brief Part of Nationwide Release of Research Conducted by Pennsylvania-based Think Tank

    Link to Related KRC Articles on Education and Child Care

    Harrisburg – In the 1980s about 40 percent of teaching staff in Pennsylvania's center-based preschool programs outside the public schools had a four-year college degree. Today, according to a new study by the Keystone Research Center, the number is 27 percent.

  • Press Release
    October 16, 2001 - 3:47pm

    Harrisburg, October 16, 2001 - Low salaries and high turnover threaten the quality of early education and child care in Pennsylvania, according to new surveys of child care providers analyzed in a report by the Keystone Research Center released today. Joined by a half dozen state lawmakers at an 11 a.m. press conference in the Capitol Media Center, early childhood advocates called on Governor Schweiker to make children a priority.

  • Briefing Paper
    October 1, 2001 - 11:33am

    In the late 1990s, child care stakeholders created regional partnerships in Allegheny County (“Pathways for Early Education Professionals”), Southeast Pennsylvania (“Gateways SE. PA.”), and York County (“Focus on Our Future”). These partnerships formed as part of the “Gateways to Early Childhood Careers Initiative” launched by the Center for Career Development in Early Care and Education at Wheelock College in Boston.

  • Press Release
    July 25, 2001 - 3:46pm

    Harrisburg, July 25 -- Five hundred and thirty-five thousand Pennsylvanians live in working families that have one to three children under age 12 and do not earn enough to pay for basic necessities such as food, housing, child care and health care. Even in this period of national prosperity, that is 24 percent of such families, roughly one out of every four.

  • Press Release
    April 11, 2001 - 3:44pm

    Harrisburg, April 11 -- It has long been suspected that few child care workers get health benefits through their job and that this fuels high turnover that undermines the quality of early childhood education.

    A new report by the Keystone Research Center presents the first definitive evidence on this issue for Pennsylvania and the United States and underscores the pressing need for state action to expand health insurance for child care workers.

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